Bees use invisible heat patterns to choose flowers

Bees use invisible heat patterns to choose flowers

A new study, led by scientists from the University of Bristol, has found that a wide range of flowers produce not just signals that we can see and smell, but also ones that are invisible such as heat. In the hidden world of flower-pollinator interactions, heat can act not only as life-sustaining warmth, but can also be part of the rich variety of sensory signposts that flowers use to provide advertisement and information for their insect pollinators. The majority of flowers examined, including many common in gardens, such as poppies…

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Microbes help turn Greek yogurt waste into fuel

Microbes help turn Greek yogurt waste into fuel

Consumers across the world enjoy Greek yogurt for its taste, texture, and protein-packed punch. Reaching that perfect formula, however, generates large volumes of food waste in the form of liquid whey. Now researchers in the United States and Germany have found a way to use bacteria to turn the leftover sugars and acids from Greek yogurt into molecules that could be used in biofuels or safe feedstock additives. Their work appears December 13 in the journal Joule. “To be sustainable, you want to convert waste streams where they are made,…

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