Agricultural fungicide attracts honey bees

Agricultural fungicide attracts honey bees

Fungicides are among the top contaminants of honey bee hives and can interfere with the bees’ ability to metabolize other pesticides. When given the choice, honey bee foragers prefer to collect sugar syrup laced with the fungicide chlorothalonil over sugar syrup alone, researchers report in the journal Scientific Reports. The puzzling finding comes on the heels of other studies linking fungicides to declines in honey bee and wild bee populations. One recent study, for example, found parallels between the use of chlorothalonil and the presence of Nosema bombi, a fungal…

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Not just for Christmas: Study sheds new light on ancient human-turkey relationship

Not just for Christmas: Study sheds new light on ancient human-turkey relationship

For the first time, research has uncovered the origins of the earliest domestic turkeys in ancient Mexico. The study also suggests turkeys weren’t only prized for their meat with demand for the birds soaring with the Mayans and Aztecs because of their cultural significance in rituals and sacrifices. In an international collaboration, researchers from the University of York, the Institute of Anthropology and History in Mexico, Washington State University and Simon Fraser University, studied the remains of 55 turkeys which lived between 300BC and 1500 AD and had been discovered…

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