Gene boosts rice growth and yield in salty soil

Gene boosts rice growth and yield in salty soil

Discovery of a gene that helps rice plants grow in salty soil paves the way to developing salt-tolerant crops Members of the research team collecting samples in a rice paddy field in Changsha, China. Credit: Jianzhong Lin Around 20% of the world’s irrigated land is considered to contain elevated concentrations of salt, and the soil continues to get saltier as the climate warms. Agricultural production is hard hit by soil salinity; salt stress reduces the growth and yield of most plants, resulting in billions of dollars in crop yield losses…

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How spiders can harm and help flowering plants

How spiders can harm and help flowering plants

The enemy of my enemy is my friend. Now researchers show that this principle also holds for crab spiders and flowering plants. While it’s true that the spiders do eat or drive away useful pollinators such as bees, they’re also attracted by floral scent signals to come and help if the plant is attacked by insects intent on eating it. Crab spiders sitting on the flowers keep away bees and also plant-eating insects from visiting the plants. Credit: Anina C. Knauer Interactions between organisms such as plants and animals can…

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Lizards, mice, bats and other vertebrates are important pollinators, too

Tropical Rainforest Plants: Definition and Importance

Study reviews the global importance of vertebrate pollinators for plant reproduction Bees are not the only animals that carry pollen from flower to flower. Species with backbones, among them bats, birds, mice, and even lizards, also serve as pollinators. Although less familiar as flower visitors than insect pollinators, vertebrate pollinators are more likely to have co-evolved tight relationships of high value to the plants they service, supplying essential reproductive aid for which few or no other species may substitute. In plants known to receive flower visitations from vertebrates, fruit and…

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Meat protein is unhealthy, but protein from nuts and seeds is heart smart

10 Benefits of Red Meat for Optimum Body Building

A study conducted by researchers in California and France has found that meat protein is associated with a sharp increased risk of heart disease while protein from nuts and seeds is beneficial for the human heart. Titled “Patterns of plant and animal protein intake are strongly associated with cardiovascular mortality: The Adventist Health Study-2 cohort,” the study was a joint project of researchers from Loma Linda University School of Public Health in California and AgroParisTech and the Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique in Paris, France. The study, which was…

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Why some Beetles like Alcohol

Why some Beetles like Alcohol

Beetles share the work of cultivating their fungal gardens: some clean the tunnel systems that are being eaten into the wood, others clear the dirt from the nest and clean their fellow workers always with the aim of optimizing the symbiosis of beetle and fungus. Credit: Gernot Kunz If on a warm summer’s evening in the beer garden, small beetles dive into your beer, consider giving them a break. Referred to as “ambrosia beetles,” these insects just want what’s best for themselves and their offspring. Drawn to the smell of…

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New study finds clear differences between organic and non-organic milk and meat

For how long can Ruminant Animals be starved? Find out

In the largest study of its kind, an international team of experts led by Newcastle University, UK, has shown that both organic milk and meat contain around 50% more beneficial omega-3 fatty acids than conventionally produced products. Analyzing data from around the world, the team reviewed 196 papers on milk and 67 papers on meat and found clear differences between organic and conventional milk and meat, especially in terms of fatty acid composition, and the concentrations of certain essential minerals and antioxidants. Publishing their findings today in the British Journal…

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Forage-based diets on dairy farms produce nutritionally enhanced milk

The effect of giving fresh cassava and its peelings to your ruminant animals

Omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids are essential human nutrients, yet consuming too much omega-6 and too little omega-3 can increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, obesity, and diabetes. Today, Americans consume 10 to 15 grams of omega-6 for every gram of omega-3. Previous studies have shown that consuming organic beef or organic dairy products lowers dietary intakes of omega-6, while increasing intakes of omega-3 and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), another valuable, heart-healthy fatty acid. In a collaborative research project including the University of Minnesota, Johns Hopkins University, Newcastle University in…

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Research shows how Diet influence the spread of a Deadly Type of Breast Cancer

A single protein building block commonly found in food may hold a key to preventing the spread of an often-deadly type of breast cancer, according to a new multicenter study published today in the medical journal Nature. Investigators found that by limiting an amino acid called asparagine in laboratory mice with triple-negative breast cancer, they could dramatically reduce the ability of the cancer to travel to distant sites in the body. Among other techniques, the team used dietary restrictions to limit asparagine. Foods rich in asparagine include dairy, whey, beef,…

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Soy milk is the best plant-based milk

Soy milk is the best plant-based milk

How healthy is your almond milk really? It may taste good and may not cause you any of the unpleasant reactions caused by cow’s milk. But though plant-based milk beverages of this kind have been on the market for a couple of decades and are advertised as being healthy and wholesome for those who are lactose-intolerant, little research has been done to compare the benefits and drawbacks of the various kinds of plant-based milk. A new study from McGill University looks at the four most-commonly consumed types of milk beverages…

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New study shows producers where and how to grow cellulosic biofuel crops

New study shows producers where and how to grow cellulosic biofuel crops

According to a recent ruling by the United States Environmental Protection Agency, 288 million gallons of cellulosic biofuel must be blended into the U.S. gasoline supply in 2018. Although this figure is down slightly from last year, the industry is still growing at a modest pace. However, until now, producers have had to rely on incomplete information and unrealistic, small-scale studies in guiding their decisions about which feedstocks to grow, and where. A new multi-institution report provides practical agronomic data for five cellulosic feedstocks, which could improve adoption and increase…

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